Jun 9th

Review of A Court of Mist and Fury

Posted in Reviews
ACOMF

A Court of Mist and Fury picks up shortly after A Court of Thorns and Roses left off. Feyre is living in the Spring Court with Tamlin in the aftermath of the events under the mountain; we see the lasting effects of all of that right off the bat. Sarah J. Maas has convincingly written the symptoms of PTSD: the night terrors, the personal idiosyncrasies that develop, the willingness to temporarily sacrifice personal freedom for the feeling of safety. Her depiction of mental illness and the effects of severe trauma was nuanced and largely accurate. While browsing Twitter, I saw that many readers and bloggers found Feyre to be too annoying and grating. This struck a very personal note with me: a survivor of abuse, I too suffer from the effects of prolonged trauma. One of my largest fears after I first left my abuser and returned home was that everyone thought I was neurotic, irritating, messed up. Reading all the tweets about these things brought those fears to the forefront again. I think that as modern readers with the ability to easily spread our opinions far and wide on social media, we should think critically about the things we say and how they’ll be perceived by others. Anyways–on to other things.

I apologize in advance if you’re a fan of Tamlin–not only did I not particularly like him in the first book of the trilogy, but Maas reveals a darker side of him in A Court of Mist and Fury. I’ve seen reviews that describe him as an asshole; this is true, but his behavior goes far beyond that description. He’s controlling and abusive, stifling and manipulating Feyre. Fortunately, he becomes a lesser character as the story progresses–present for much less than half the novel.

As far as the other characters go, Rhysand is much more likeable than Tamlin. He’s more understanding of Feyre’s precarious emotional state and her needs. His inner circle really steals the show: Cassian, Azriel, Mor, and Amren are all brilliantly written. The Night Court and its citizens have much more depth than many of the other characters we previously met. It’s interesting to explore more of Rhysand’s past and come to a deeper understanding of who he is. The new characters aren’t restricted to the Night Court, as we make a somewhat brief visit to the Summer Court as well. I truly hope the characters we met there will feature more prominently in the next installment of the series.

Spoiler Alert! Click Here If You Wish to Read Spoiler Content
All in all, I thought A Court of Mist and Fury was a huge improvement on its predecessor. It’s definitely a worthwhile read, although you may find yourself disappointed if you were a big fan of Tamlin previously.

ACOMF

A Court of Mist and Fury picks up shortly after A Court of Thorns and Roses left off. Feyre is living in the Spring Court with Tamlin in the aftermath of the events under the mountain; we see the lasting effects of all of that right off the bat. Sarah J. Maas has convincingly written the symptoms of PTSD: the night terrors, the personal idiosyncrasies that develop, the willingness to temporarily sacrifice personal freedom for the feeling of safety. Her depiction of mental illness and the effects of severe trauma was nuanced and largely accurate. While browsing Twitter, I saw that many readers and bloggers found Feyre to be too annoying and grating. This struck a very personal note with me: a survivor of abuse, I too suffer from the effects of prolonged trauma. One of my largest fears after I first left my abuser and returned home was that everyone thought I was neurotic, irritating, messed up. Reading all the tweets about these things brought those fears to the forefront again. I think that as modern readers with the ability to easily spread our opinions far and wide on social media, we should think critically about the things we say and how they’ll be perceived by others. Anyways–on to other things.

I apologize in advance if you’re a fan of Tamlin–not only did I not particularly like him in the first book of the trilogy, but Maas reveals a darker side of him in A Court of Mist and Fury. I’ve seen reviews that describe him as an asshole; this is true, but his behavior goes far beyond that description. He’s controlling and abusive, stifling and manipulating Feyre. Fortunately, he becomes a lesser character as the story progresses–present for much less than half the novel.

As far as the other characters go, Rhysand is much more likeable than Tamlin. He’s more understanding of Feyre’s precarious emotional state and her needs. His inner circle really steals the show: Cassian, Azriel, Mor, and Amren are all brilliantly written. The Night Court and its citizens have much more depth than many of the other characters we previously met. It’s interesting to explore more of Rhysand’s past and come to a deeper understanding of who he is. The new characters aren’t restricted to the Night Court, as we make a somewhat brief visit to the Summer Court as well. I truly hope the characters we met there will feature more prominently in the next installment of the series.

Spoiler Alert! Click Here If You Wish to Read Spoiler Content
All in all, I thought A Court of Mist and Fury was a huge improvement on its predecessor. It’s definitely a worthwhile read, although you may find yourself disappointed if you were a big fan of Tamlin previously.

By Oliver Lumpkin

Oli oli oxen-free

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